Easter

Enter then, all of you, into the joy of our Lord.

First and last, receive alike your reward.

Rich and poor, dance together.

You who fasted and you who have not fasted, rejoice together.

The table is fully laden: let all enjoy it.

The calf is fatted: let none go away hungry.

--St. John Chrysostom, Easter Sermon

50 Days of Easter

Why does Easter seem to go on forever? You do the math.

You have put on Christ, in him you have been baptized.

When people wear new clothes at Easter

it is a reminder that we "put on Christ."

This is why we put a white garment

on each person that is baptized.

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EASTER EGGS

--Eggs remind Christians of the end of the Lenten fast. Historically Christians fasted from eggs and milk as well as meat during Lent. On Easter Christians rejoice in the abundance of God’s love – no longer fasting, we are full of joy.

--A traditional pious legend passed down in the Eastern Church holds that St. Mary Magdalene was bringing cooked eggs to share with the other women at the tomb of Jesus. The eggs in her basket miraculously turned brilliant red when she beheld the Risen Christ. The egg is taken to represent the boulder over the entrance to the tomb of Jesus.

--Another common legend talks about St. Mary Magdalene's role as an evangelist, helping to spread the Gospel. It says that after Jesus' Ascension, Mary travelled to visit the Emperor Tiberius in Rome and greeted him with: “Christ has risen” [a traditional Orthodox Easter greeting, also adopted by many Christians]; whereupon he pointed to an egg on his table and quipped, “Christ has no more risen than that egg is red.” The egg, it is said, immediately turned blood red.

Be sure to dye one Easter egg red to remember the apostle to the apostles.

ACTIVITIES

Why not use Legos for your Easter centerpiece

Create your own Easter Scene with these printables and a few paper towel tubes.

Even if you aren't from The Netherlands you can put together these Easter scenes. (Choose Diorama "Jezus is opgestaan")

In Greece it is the custom to observe the Monday after Easter as a day of laughter to celebrate the joke God played on Satan